Turkey Noodle Soup for #SundaySupper

Turkey Noodle Soup

There is a chilly wind blowing. And I am having some chills too. The combination of colder weather blowing in and not feeling so good makes me want a hot and comforting meal. It has been a whirlwind of a week catching up from being out of town. I very much needed to feel better to tackle the to-do list. I knew exactly what to make – homemade turkey noodle soup.

I had a turkey carcass in the freezer. All I needed was some turkey necks and vegetables to make the stock. I think homemade stock is a magical elixir that makes you feel better. At least it works for me. It replenishes the body and soul. The flavor is above and beyond any broth or stock from the store. Another one of my favorite recipes with stock is chicken and dumplings. Remember to keep your turkey carcass (bones) when you cook a turkey. Put it in the freezer so you can make stock with it later.

The rest of the soup is easy once the stock is done. Not that making the stock is difficult either. Basically all you have to do is put the ingredients in a pot, let it simmer, strain, and it is done. Then add noodles and chopped cooked turkey. A little later you have a bowl of rich, flavorful soup. It shows that only a few ingredients can come together and make something incredible.

Turkey noodle soup is perfect for today’s Sunday Supper event. Our host, Susan from The Girl In The Little Red Kitchen, asked the team to highlight soul warming dishes. Check out these wonderful recipes:

Main Entrees: 

Chili/Stews:

Soups:

Desserts/Beverages:

How do you warm your soul? Is it with food, volunteering, or spending time with family and friends? I’ll make my turkey noodle soup and share it with family and friends. The whole thing warms my soul from cooking, eating, and seeing how much they enjoy the meal.

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter each Sunday. We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET and you do not want to miss out on the fun. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check our our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Turkey Noodle Soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Ingredients
  • 1 turkey carcass (bones from cooked turkey)*
  • 3 to 4 raw turkey necks
  • 3 celery stalks, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 3 carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 onion, peeled & sliced into thick rings
  • 1 whole garlic bulb, top sliced off
  • 5 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 10 whole peppercorns
  • 3 quarts water
  • Chopped cooked turkey**
  • Egg noodles**
Instructions
  1. Place turkey carcass, necks, celery, carrots, onion, garlic, thyme, bay leaves, salt, peppercorns, and water in a large soup pot or dutch oven. Make sure water covers all the ingredients. Bring just to a boil but do not let it get to a rolling boil. Turn the heat to low and simmer loosely covered for 1½ to 2 hours. Skim off any foam that forms on the surface.
  2. Taste the stock and cook longer if a more concentrated flavor is desired.
  3. Remove and discard turkey carcass and necks. Set a strainer in a very large bowl and pour remaining contents into the strainer. Discard cooked vegetables, herbs, and spices. Wipe out and clean the cooking pot. Skim off any clear fat on top of the stock by using a large spoon or with a gravy separator. Discard fat.
  4. Return stock to the pot by pouring it through a strainer lined with a cheesecloth. Bring the stock back to a boil. Add the chopped turkey and noodles.**
  5. Cook until noodles are done. Taste and add salt and/or pepper if needed. Serve hot.
Notes
You can make the stock without the turkey carcass by using 1 or 2 more turkey necks.

*The amount of stock, chopped turkey, and noodles you use depends on the amount of soup you want to make. You can freeze a portion of the stock for later use.

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Comments

  1. says

    Turkey neck is quite the delicacy. I have yet to try it out but i’m thinking i will. Loving the ingredients, Renee! Simple yet flavourful! I would strain soup too. I have a thing about consistency. I enjoy a smooth soup – just like this! Happy Sunday Supper!

    • says

      I’ll be away and will not be able to participate in the Thanksgiving leftovers event. That’s one of the reasons I wanted to share it today so folks would have it before Thanksgiving.

  2. says

    Now this takes patience and makes for messy fingers too!
    There will be plenty of Turkey left on the carcass that either comes off into the stock or needs a little encouragement.
    My mother did this approach with the roast chicken from Sunday because it gave enough for Chicken Stew on Monday

  3. says

    Thank you so much for posting this recipe, Renee. My husband always wants to keep the turkey carcass after Thanksgiving and until now I just did not know how to use it :) Again, thank you!

  4. says

    Hey! I’m posting again because I’m not sure if my first post went through. I was saying how much I like the abundance of noodles and that my son would love this dish because he loves turkey.

  5. Sarah says

    I totally agree with you about making home made stock. I don’t think it’s too difficult to make. And it makes it that much better. Your turkey noodle soup should be on an ad for cold medicine or soup can. It looks so comforting.

  6. says

    Oh I think someone was playing with the aperture (or at least it looks like it on my phone haha). Great job! Now I want a bowl after being outside for work in the cold. Brr!

  7. says

    I think a lot of people forget about making stock from the turkey carcass after Thanksgiving. It is such a great way to get the most out of your bird and it is wonderful to have on hand for a variety of dishes, soup being one of them. Thanks for the great reminder.

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